waywardschoolofdemons

Making up stories to explain away other people and their crazy actions was a natural human impulse.

Theo just did it a little more… aggressively.

http://entertheunseen.com/a-very-small-heist-of-epic-implications-01-01/ (via waywardschoolofdemons)

This is a project I’ve been illustrating for!! go check!! Go check it out!!

tokyodemons

tokyodemons:

sequentialstate:

Review: Dinner Ditz by Alexis Cooke

It isn’t often that two of my comics interest seem so perfectly aligned in one project. My interest in manga is what drove me to comics in general, and my experiences at conventions have pushed me towards smaller works and small press. So when a mini from Chromatic Press comes out that has art reminiscent of Natsume Ono, you can bet that you have my interest.

Dinner Ditz is 60 pages black and white comics that takes a lot of its cues from shojo and lighter yaoi manga. Peregrine, who has recently come out and gotten a divorce, wants to connect with his daughter Lottie through cooking, but he’s awful in the kitchen. He enlists the aid of a cooking coach Otho to help him learn to cook better and be less nervous in the kitchen.

Cooke has a good eye for character design. Her male leads are the pensive type with hawkish features and strong jawlines, a similarity to the work of Natsume Ono (the nervous, hawkish guy is the bread and butter of her storytelling). Throughout the mini, the character interactions of Dinner Ditz are the reason it works. The tropes, like the nervous divorcee, are familiar, but the focus is on how two men spend time together, and how a father loves his daughter. Dinner Ditz is at its best when Lottie and Peregrine are on the same page together – there’s a true chemistry in the illustration, and the writing is at its most sincere.

Still, the mini is not without problems. Cooke has a tendency to overuse sound-effect words that explain a face or an action when the meaning could be easily interpreted from her illustration alone. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the words “love nudge” used as a sound effect before. Cooke also over-relies on the profile shot, which makes the comic feel stiff in places. Using a larger variety of character placements, camera angles, and shots would likely improve the flow of the comic and keep the reader’s eye. There were also a few places where the writing felt a bit stilted, especially the opening and closing text.

I think Dinner Ditz is a great start. Cooke’s style is bright and expressive, and Dinner Ditz seems like the beginnings of what will likely be a strong professional career in comics. It’s certainly a cute story. And as Cooke continues to grow as a cartoonist, I’ll be interested to see if she brings us back to the world of Peregrine and Ortho.

——

Dinner Ditz is written and illustrated by Alexis Cooke (tumblr: anxiousa), and was published by chromaticpress in their sparklermonthly magazine. Sparkler is in the middle of a subscription drive - $5/month gives you access to a lot of comics, prose, and audio material.

A review copy was provided by the publisher for this review.

Cooke’s style is bright and expressive, and Dinner Ditz seems like the beginnings of what will likely be a strong professional career in comics. 

Totally agree. <3 We love Alexis.

Download the complete Dinner Ditz: ebook | print version (zine for TCAF)

Read online (Chap 1 free, Chap 2 for Sparkler members )

sequentialstate

sequentialstate:

Review: Dinner Ditz by Alexis Cooke

It isn’t often that two of my comics interest seem so perfectly aligned in one project. My interest in manga is what drove me to comics in general, and my experiences at conventions have pushed me towards smaller works and small press. So when a mini from Chromatic Press comes out that has art reminiscent of Natsume Ono, you can bet that you have my interest.

Dinner Ditz is 60 pages black and white comics that takes a lot of its cues from shojo and lighter yaoi manga. Peregrine, who has recently come out and gotten a divorce, wants to connect with his daughter Lottie through cooking, but he’s awful in the kitchen. He enlists the aid of a cooking coach Otho to help him learn to cook better and be less nervous in the kitchen.

Cooke has a good eye for character design. Her male leads are the pensive type with hawkish features and strong jawlines, a similarity to the work of Natsume Ono (the nervous, hawkish guy is the bread and butter of her storytelling). Throughout the mini, the character interactions of Dinner Ditz are the reason it works. The tropes, like the nervous divorcee, are familiar, but the focus is on how two men spend time together, and how a father loves his daughter. Dinner Ditz is at its best when Lottie and Peregrine are on the same page together – there’s a true chemistry in the illustration, and the writing is at its most sincere.

Still, the mini is not without problems. Cooke has a tendency to overuse sound-effect words that explain a face or an action when the meaning could be easily interpreted from her illustration alone. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the words “love nudge” used as a sound effect before. Cooke also over-relies on the profile shot, which makes the comic feel stiff in places. Using a larger variety of character placements, camera angles, and shots would likely improve the flow of the comic and keep the reader’s eye. There were also a few places where the writing felt a bit stilted, especially the opening and closing text.

I think Dinner Ditz is a great start. Cooke’s style is bright and expressive, and Dinner Ditz seems like the beginnings of what will likely be a strong professional career in comics. It’s certainly a cute story. And as Cooke continues to grow as a cartoonist, I’ll be interested to see if she brings us back to the world of Peregrine and Otho.

——

Dinner Ditz is written and illustrated by Alexis Cooke (tumblr: anxiousa), and was published by chromaticpress in their sparklermonthly magazine. Sparkler is in the middle of a subscription drive - $5/month gives you access to a lot of comics, prose, and audio material.

A review copy was provided by the publisher for this review.

OMG!!! OMG!!! What a wonderful thing to wake up to!!!  Thank you for such a wonderful review!!

alexiscooke

meboringlyfe asked:

What type of paper do you use for printing?

alexiscooke answered:

It depends, I REALLY like paper.

I’ll keep the answer dwindled down to book printing (because this answer would get longer other wise).

For books, I try to chose paper that suits the story and so I tend to spend toooooo much time selecting paper. Until recently I hadn’t settled on a brand, but if your thinking about making books, I’d recommend any paper from Mohawk. They are just beyond beautiful and very affordable.  If you’re looking for some nicer reams of paper and can afford to put a little more capital into your project, I’d suggest French Paper Company. They have some GREAT paper colors and the paper texture is JUST! UH! it’s great! (Did I mention I like paper?)

Ahem! On to specifics (lol)! For books like Monster or SUB- vol1 I use Mohawk i-tone paper (65 cover weight) for the interior and then a Canson Colored Bristol for the covers (they come in sheets of 22x30inch I’m pretty sure).  For How to Feed Dep. I use a glossy magazine paper and then a cream bristol from Wasu (Also a decent brand) for the cover (cover stock weight).  Circle is printed on epson doubleweight matte for the interior and some light weight paper that looks like it’s made from paper bags (I can’t remember what the paper is since I bought the paper some time ago).

I think that’s all the paper stocks I use for books.  I hope this answers your question?

-A.

sparklermonthly
sparklermonthly:

sotwnisey:

The incredible anxiousa was in town yesterday, so I drew her some Dinner Ditz gift art!
It was awesome getting to hang out with you again! &lt;3

*screech* Our lovey artists making art for each other!! (Denise’s "Before You Go" is currently behind our pay-wall, but you can read the first chapter of Alexis’s "Dinner Ditz" for free! ;-) ) 

SREAMz OF JOY!!! &lt;3 &lt;3 &lt;3

sparklermonthly:

sotwnisey:

The incredible anxiousa was in town yesterday, so I drew her some Dinner Ditz gift art!

It was awesome getting to hang out with you again! <3

*screech* Our lovey artists making art for each other!! (Denise’s "Before You Go" is currently behind our pay-wall, but you can read the first chapter of Alexis’s "Dinner Ditz" for free! ;-) ) 

SREAMz OF JOY!!! <3 <3 <3